The 2012 U.S. Presidential Election: What the Outcome Means for South Sudan

The Sudd Institute

Authors: Jok Madut Jok, Augustino Ting Mayai

Organization: The Sudd Institute

Type: Weekly Reviews

Date: 13/11/2012

 

Publication Summary

The recent re-election of Barack Obama for a second term as president was received in South Sudan with jubilation. Renewed hopes have been placed on the US as one of the strongest partners in development and governance in this young country. What does President Obama’s reelection mean for U.S. policy toward South Sudan? How might his reelection impact peace and security in our new state?

This week's Weekly Review provides the Sudd Institute's analysis on these issues.

 

 

Jok Madut Jok's Biography

Jok Madut Jok is trained in the anthropology of health and holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He is a fellow of Rift Valley Institute and Director of the Sudd Institute. Jok has held fellowship positions at a number of other institutions, including the United States Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He also served in the Government of South Sudan as undersecretary in the Ministry of Culture and Heritage for three years. He has also worked in aid and development and author of four books and numerous articles covering gender, sexuality and reproductive health, humanitarian aid, ethnography of political violence, gender-based violence, war and slavery, and the politics of identity in South Sudan and Sudan. His book Breaking Sudan: The Search for Peace, was published in 2017 by OneWorld.

 

Augustino Ting Mayai's Biography

Augustino Ting Mayai is the Director of Research at the Sudd Institute and an Assistant Professor at the University of Juba’s School of Public Service. He holds a PhD in Sociology, with concentrations on demography and development from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He currently studies how state effectiveness affects child health outcomes in South Sudan and Ethiopia. Dr. Mayai has written extensively on South Sudan’s current affairs.

 

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